John Manuel

Writer, graphic designer and author John Manuel began his Greek experience after a chance meeting with a half-Greek girl in a bar in his home town of Bath, UK during the 1970’s.

What began as an antipathy developed into a tolerance and finally blossomed into a love for his mother-in-law’s country. Prior to moving to Rhodes in 2005, John’s frequent family visits to Greece gave him an understanding of the Greek psyche that shines through his insightful and frequently funny accounts about such visits, most of which feature in the first volume of his “Ramblings From Rhodes” series, Feta Compli.

The “Ramblings From Rhodes” books are personal, episodic accounts of all kinds of people, places and things that he’s encountered and experienced in every corner of his adopted country, although two, Tzatziki For You to Say and A Plethora of Posts are mainly about daily life year-round on Rhodes. John also runs a popular blog all about life on Rhodes: http://ramblingsfromrhodes.blogspot.com

As well as his travel memoirs, John has also written several works of fiction which are all available on Amazon worldwide.

John also runs a hugely popular reading group on Facebook for all lovers of things Greek, called A Good Greek Read.

You can follow John on various social networking sites including:

http://johnphilipmanuel.wix.com/works

Facebook

Amazon Worldwide

Goodreads

Below is a selection of some of John’s works:

FETA COMPLI: RAMBLINGS FROM RHODES BOOK 1 (Non-Fiction/Travel Memoir)

John Manuel and his wife Yvonne Maria made the decision to up-sticks and re-locate to Rhodes after 30 years of marriage and innumerable visits to Greece, both as tourists and to visit relatives (his wife’s mother was from Athens).
They sold their house and virtually everything in it (or so they thought until they started packing up what was left and realised they would need a small commercial vehicle to transport everything over land to their new home).
The books opens with John negotiating to buy a 15-year-old Mitsubishi L300 van for £800 from a used car salesman. Warned not to thrash the van or go more than 60 to 65 mph they set off for a new life.

THE VIEW FROM KLEOBOULOS

Dean and Alyson are two young people who come together in a bar one evening in their home city of Bath, UK. Alyson’s mother once worked with Brian, a musician who never quite “made it,” but ends up playing guitar and singing in a Lindian Bar. Quite how Brian and Christine (Alyson’s mother) come to have a devastating effect on their daughter’s relationship with the man of her dreams will have you gripped, both with emotion and with intrigue. A real page-turner, the perfect holiday read, “The View From Kleoboulos” is Thomas Hardy for the 21st century. Sometimes the past comes back to haunt you, but occasionally it comes back to bite.

A BRIEF MOMENT OF SUNSHINE

Claire Mason’s life seemed to be on track. She was a successful artist and she had a good marriage to a loving husband. Then, almost overnight, a succession of events turn her entire life upside down. How will she deal with it? Will she emerge from the maelstrom that threatens to destroy her mind, or will she succumb and thus implode emotionally and mentally? How do visits to Greece play a part in her navigating her way through the tangle of events that threaten to destroy her sanity? As with “”The View From Kleoboulos”” there are twists aplenty here. In Claire Mason’s life, will she ever glimpse a brief moment of sunshine?

THE EVE OF DECONSTRUCTION

Chippenham UK, present day. Eve Watkins is a fairly average modern woman in her early forties with two teenage kids, a loving husband with a steady job and career of her own. It looks like her average life is fairly uneventful, yet secure.

Following the death of her mother she discovers things about her own past
that come as a complete surprise to Eve. These lead her eventually out to a small village in mainland Greece, where developments soon lead to her life beginning to deconstruct before her.

Ought she have let sleeping dogs lie? Yet she knew she had to find out. She had to know who she really was.

Whatever the cost.